The Girl Behind The Door: A Memoir By John Brooks

10 Feb

Kat Cormack:

Dear Casey, i can’t believe so much time has passed since you left but i remember it like it was last week. You will always be missed but more importantly you will always be loved. I hope you have found peace.

Originally posted on Parenting and Attachment:

TGBTD-eBookCov_03-600“This book should be a wakeup call to all adoptive parents and professionals about the urgent issues adoptees and their parents face.”

Nancy Newton Verrier, attachment therapist and author

The Primal Wound and Coming Home to Self

A Marin County, California father embarks on a journey to understand what led his seventeen-year-old daughter, Casey, to take her life. He travels back to her abandonment at birth and adoption from a Polish orphanage. His search leads to a condition known as attachment disorder, an affliction common among children who have been abandoned, neglected or abused. It explained everything. The Girl Behind The Door integrates a tragic personal adoption story with information from the experts to teach other families what the Brookses learned too late.

Who should read it?

    Anyone with a connection to the adoption “triad.”
    Anyone who has lost a loved one to suicide.
   …

View original 45 more words

Talking about mental health on the Chrissy B show

6 Feb

Image

So some of you may know that late last year i appeared on the Chrissy B Show to talk about mental health in a special program titled “A mental health issue doesn’t mean i’m crazy”. The show was broadcast in January and is now available on YouTube for everyone to watch.

I first met Chrissy at a great event held at Westminster University called “Living or Surviving”. Chrissy spoke about her experiences of struggling with Depression at University and how she now tries to help other people with her inspirational television program. We were joined by speakers including Paul Canonville who talked very movingly about his own experiences of mental illness in sport and Professor Damien Ridge who is a psychotherapist.

You can watch me talk about mental health, the WellHappy app and working for both YoungMinds and the NHS below. I’m not on for the whole thing but it’s worth watching the whole episode:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQLz3Nw2-4k&feature=share&list=UUHfwS2btVLvqqAQ-69c0PKw&index=3

 

Acceptance speech perhaps?

22 Jan

It’s taken me awhile to put out this first blog of the year. After the literal and figurative madness that sums up the end of 2013 I for some reason naively thought January might be a bit quieter..how wrong I was!

Over the Christmas holidays I was surprised to discover I had been nominated for not one but two awards from Mentally Wealthy. I’m a long time reader of the site and previous iterations such as This Week In Mentalists and have a huge amount of respect for the bloggers involved so I was certainly not expecting to see my own name appear in the nominations!

I came runner up in This Week In Mentalists Award 2013 in “Campaigning” and the Twitter based
Twental Health Awards 2013  in “Professional Not Otherwise Specified”.

Clearly all those teenage years hidden behind a computer screen blogging, moderating and being on social media paid off!-I have of course pointed this out to my parents to show them I didn’t waste my teenage years online! It is still something I have to pinch myself over though. As someone who at points genuinely didn’t expect to see her 16th birthday let alone their 24th it amazes me how far I have come. I’ve said many times before that if I could go back and tell my 14 year old self what things would be like in a decade I would most likely laugh in my own face. I am proof that it can and does get better even if “better” isn’t what you expected or planned.

Then, as if that wasn’t enough (and believe me i was taken aback as it was), Vinspired announced that I was a Regional Winner in their Vinspired National Awards as “Most Outstanding Social Entrepreneur” for my work on the WellHappy app.

This is a huge thing for both myself personally and for the WellHappy project and I am still so stunned that I’ve won.

So I guess I have to do some kind of acceptance speech? Don’t worry i’m not going to sit here for the next 10 pages and bore the pants off you but I do have some people that need to be thanked for their part in this.

YoungMinds

Firstly I need to thank YoungMinds which includes all the young people and staff I have been so fortunate to have in my life these past five years. It’s corny but it’s also fair to say that I could not have done this without you all and you deserve a lot of the credit for this award. Before I started volunteering with the charity I was very much in the mental health “closet”..now I am winning awards for speaking out about mental health & wellbeing. Participation helped me find my voice and campaigning gave me a platform and a purpose and I don’t dare think where I would be now without your support.

NHS

I also want to thank the NHS or more specifically my employers and colleagues within the NHS and in particular at myhealthlondon. When I was brought in to work in the NHS on secondment from YoungMinds for the WellHappy project it was a test, a trial run for 4 months. 15 months later I am still working with you after repeated contract extensions and a promotion. You took a chance on me, knowing full well all of my mental health history and that I was still technically a “young person”. It has been a pleasure having a job where I actually feel accepted and like I am able to do some good and make changes for the better.

And I would also like to say a big thank you to my wonderful friend Jenny Hills for nominating me.

And one last thank you to my long suffering boyfriend Ryan Jackson for putting up with me while i run around like, (once again both a literal & figurative) crazy lady. I certainly couldn’t have done half as much over the past 5 years without your support.

Anyway that is quite enough gushing for me for one day, i’m not sure it suits me! At this point I would probably trip over my feet on the way off stage.

And the thing is, this was only the start of the year and much has happened since then, but that is for another post.

The WOW Petition just reached 100k signatures

30 Nov wow

Today the WOW (War on Welfare) petition reached and in fact exceeded the 100,000 signature mark.

Why is this important?

The petition calls for:

A Cumulative Impact Assessment of all cuts and changes affecting sick & disabled people, their families and carers, and a free vote on repeal of the Welfare Reform Act.

An immediate end to the Work Capability Assessment, as voted for by the British Medical Association.

Consultation between the Depts of Health & Education to improve support into work for sick & disabled people, and an end to forced work under threat of sanctions for people on disability benefits

An Independent, Committee-Based Inquiry into Welfare Reform, covering but not limited to: (1) Care home admission rises, daycare centres, access to education for people with learning difficulties, universal mental health treatments, Remploy closures; (2) DWP media links, the ATOS contract, IT implementation of Universal Credit; (3) Human rights abuses against disabled people, excess claimant deaths & the disregard of medical evidence in decision making by ATOS, DWP & the Tribunal Service.

As the petition passed 10,000 signatures the government were required to submit an official response, they stated:

This e-petition will remain open to signatures until the published closing date and will be considered for debate by the Backbench Business Committee should it pass the 100 000 signature threshold.

This has now happened.

You can also add your signature here.

The problem with IAPT

27 Nov Ask-for-IAPT

I’ve just been referred to IAPT when i really shouldn’t have been, i will explain..

A bit of background: most of you know that i have struggled with various mental health issues for the majority of my life. I’ve also used mental health services on and off for the past decade to try and move towards that elusive “recovery” we hear so much about. I’m also a very well-informed service user with 5 years of  experience working with organisations like YoungMinds-basically i know what i’m talking about when it comes to mental health and in particular what is best for me.

I recently went back to my GP in a very distressed state. My anxiety recently has been through the roof and it’s had a crippling knock on effect on my mood and several other conditions which in turn has lead to a sharp deterioration in both my mental and physical health. Basically i was not in a good way-another bad downspike in what for me is a severe and enduring problem.

This one GP in particular is one i try to avoid as we have had several clashes over my treatment in the past. After refusing to prescribe me more medication she offered to refer me back for CBT (which i have had previously & has been relatively effective). I agreed but pointed out it would probably be at least a year until i was seen and that i would need to continue medication in the meantime (which she was not happy about). She told me that several of her patients had only waited a month or two.

This struck me as odd-i look back and want to kick myself; i should have known why.

She was not referring me back to the adult CMHT who have seen me before and know me. She was referring me to IAPT.

I have since been back to the surgery to see a different clinician who confirmed exactly what i already knew: i should never have been referred to IAPT and my local IAPT service won’t take me-i am too severe a case with far more than mild-moderate Depression/Anxiety.

It’s very frustrating to continually have to educate clinicians myself about things they should know about-mental health and services in particular. I often have to explain mental health conditions to GPs (who do not need to have any training on mental health to qualify by the way) or tell them about third sector services in the area that they could refer people to.

I am exhausted from having to constantly and almost aggressively self advocate in order to get any treatment at all.

Oh the irony..

For me this is actually almost painfully ironic.

You see while i was a VIK at YoungMinds i was part of several consultations on IAPT before it was up and running and i even facilitated group workshops for other young people on the subject. I liked the idea in principle, after all it would offer therapy to so many people who usually wouldn’t be considered “ill enough” or would have ended up of the bottom of the average 18 month waiting list of adult mental health services. It would also bring in a self referral element often lacking from statutory mental health services and the waiting lists they suggested were much better too.

But i did argue one point very strongly:

My concern was that the implementation of IAPT might lead to cuts in other psychological therapies on offer and that we ran the risk of IAPT becoming the be-all and end-all. This is because IAPT is quicker and also therefore cheaper than more traditional talking therapies making it more attractive to commissioners and cash-strapped trusts.

I said repeatedly that there must be safeguards put in place and that clinicians and patients needed to be fully aware that IAPT is not appropriate for everyone, especially not those with more severe issues. Especially as IAPT often offers just 6-12 CBT sessions which are not appropriate for every condition and often not enough (i’ve had about 30 sessions over the years so far and i’m still painfully ill).

Sadly it seems my fears have been realised.

From January-March 2012/2013 259,016 people were referred to IAPT but only 154,722 entered treatment which suggests to me that i am not alone in being wrongly referred to the service. (Source: Health & Social Care Information Centre IAPT data set).

I have also spoken to a large number of people, especially in the 18-25 age range who have been referred to IAPT when they should not have been.

I would be very interested to hear of anyone else’s experiences of being wrongly referred and will be voicing my concerns on this matter to the NHS and YoungMinds.

What is IAPT?

IAPT stands for “Improving Access to Psychological Therapies” and is an NHS program to extend access to talking therapies for over 18s in England (there is also CYPIAPT for children and young people). It is usually offered to people with mild-moderate Depression, Anxiety or Stress.

Video

Patients and the public give their views on NHS 7 Day Services

25 Nov

As a mental health service user and an NHS staff member i was recently asked by NHS IQ to give my views on what the effect of not having 7 Day Services has on patients. You can see me and other members of the public and patients giving our views here.

EHI Live 2013

15 Nov EHI_Live_2013

Last week was a busy one, i was at EHI Live 2013 in Birmingham on Tuesday and Wednesday and wisely for once chose to take the rest of the week as leave to recover: i predict many of you that know me just fell off your chairs reading that last part!

I was one of the speakers at the HANDI Health App conference as part of EHI Live 2013 and it was a great experience and quite unlike most big events i’ve been too in the past.

Live-and-HANDI-logos

Now this is really silly but i must confess that at first i had no idea what i was signing up for. I was approached by Ewan Davis to speak at HANDI Health about my experience of working on the WellHappy app. I’m always more than happy to talk about the app (in fact you try and stop me!) so i quickly said yes.

It was only after i said yes and got some more details that i realised i was going to be speaking at EHI, one of the biggest health/tech events in the calendar!

It was nice to know that i was going to be in good company, i found out early on that Sarah Amani who i met in person for the first time recently at the IAYMH Conference in Brighton was speaking the day after me about developing the “My Journey” Early Intervention in Psychosis app. I was also going to get the chance to meet up with an old VIK friend Mark who i don’t get to see often now that the project has ended.

The first person i ran into at the event in fact was Geraldine Strathdee, the National Clinical Director for Mental Health in the NHS & Royal College of Psychiatrist award winner. I had been so busy preparing for my part of EHI that i didn’t even realise there was also a workstream dedicated to Mental Health Informatics.

Being the massive nerd that i am i ended up attending a talk and one of the workshops on mental health informatics and in particular the Mental Health Minimum Data Set produced by the Health & Social Care Information Centre. I won’t go on about this bit as i know it’s niche but if this is your area i strongly recommend you read into the minimum data set. It’s where we get much of our mental health statistics and is only going to grow in terms of the amount of data and it’s importance.

Overall the event was very interesting, a lot more tech based than most of the events i attend so i definitely feel i learnt a lot that i probably wouldn’t have otherwise. It was also a chance to check out some really innovative things like a 3D Printer being used to make artificial limbs and a game you can play with eye movement detection-so completely hands free!

I will leave you with a slightly more off the wall note..the conference was also a good excuse for silly free things..apparently stress balls are out and odd animals are in. I’ve been picking up these oddball things for years now and these are the new additions to what i jokingly call my stress farm! I also have a telephone, sheep, cow and a stress pizza of all things knocking around somewhere..

Yes i know i have weird hobbies..

Yes i know i have weird hobbies..

A Boat With No Engine

by Aisha Mirza

Mental Political Parent

One of the Best Blogs on the Internet

Parenting and Attachment

An Adoptive Father's Lessons Learned About Attachment Disorder

Bipolar and BPD Support

for those diagnosed with bipolar disorder and/or borderline personality disorder

WOW Petition Campaign

Site of the Resistance to the War on Welfare

The Fementalists

At the intersection of feminism and mental health activism

Broken Light: A Photography Collective

We are photographers living with or affected by mental illness; supporting each other one photograph at a time. Join our community, submit today!

All that I am, all that I ever was...

I am more than my mental health. I am more than my homelessness. I am more than any one aspect of me. I am Addy. And this is...

Notes from a gay mentalist

Journeys through my mind and life in general

The Psychiatry SHO*

*couch not included

Looking for Lucy

I blog on my journey of recovery from a chaotic place to a [hopefully] more stable one and finding my true self in the process.

Save Me From BPD

My journey with Borderline Personality Disorder

My journey.

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I, I took the one less travelled by, and that has made all the difference.

PSYCH'D

Follow me in my journey to become a Forensic Psychologist as a mature student.

Eat Read Glam

British based beauty, book, food and humour blog!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,937 other followers