EHI Live 2013

Last week was a busy one, i was at EHI Live 2013 in Birmingham on Tuesday and Wednesday and wisely for once chose to take the rest of the week as leave to recover: i predict many of you that know me just fell off your chairs reading that last part!

I was one of the speakers at the HANDI Health App conference as part of EHI Live 2013 and it was a great experience and quite unlike most big events i’ve been too in the past.

Live-and-HANDI-logos

Now this is really silly but i must confess that at first i had no idea what i was signing up for. I was approached by Ewan Davis to speak at HANDI Health about my experience of working on the WellHappy app. I’m always more than happy to talk about the app (in fact you try and stop me!) so i quickly said yes.

It was only after i said yes and got some more details that i realised i was going to be speaking at EHI, one of the biggest health/tech events in the calendar!

It was nice to know that i was going to be in good company, i found out early on that Sarah Amani who i met in person for the first time recently at the IAYMH Conference in Brighton was speaking the day after me about developing the “My Journey” Early Intervention in Psychosis app. I was also going to get the chance to meet up with an old VIK friend Mark who i don’t get to see often now that the project has ended.

The first person i ran into at the event in fact was Geraldine Strathdee, the National Clinical Director for Mental Health in the NHS & Royal College of Psychiatrist award winner. I had been so busy preparing for my part of EHI that i didn’t even realise there was also a workstream dedicated to Mental Health Informatics.

Being the massive nerd that i am i ended up attending a talk and one of the workshops on mental health informatics and in particular the Mental Health Minimum Data Set produced by the Health & Social Care Information Centre. I won’t go on about this bit as i know it’s niche but if this is your area i strongly recommend you read into the minimum data set. It’s where we get much of our mental health statistics and is only going to grow in terms of the amount of data and it’s importance.

Overall the event was very interesting, a lot more tech based than most of the events i attend so i definitely feel i learnt a lot that i probably wouldn’t have otherwise. It was also a chance to check out some really innovative things like a 3D Printer being used to make artificial limbs and a game you can play with eye movement detection-so completely hands free!

I will leave you with a slightly more off the wall note..the conference was also a good excuse for silly free things..apparently stress balls are out and odd animals are in. I’ve been picking up these oddball things for years now and these are the new additions to what i jokingly call my stress farm! I also have a telephone, sheep, cow and a stress pizza of all things knocking around somewhere..

Yes i know i have weird hobbies..

Yes i know i have weird hobbies..

Mental health, GPs and young people

This morning i called up my doctor’s surgery to get a much needed appointment with a GP. For most this is a task that needs little if any thought. For me however it can be a potential minefield.

What’s more when i called up i was informed that my appointment would be with a new doctor, not one that i had met before or had any experience of. Accepting the appointment, was for me, a pretty big gamble.

I’ll explain. I have had mental health problems to some level or another for most of my life and i have been using mental health services for coming up to nine years now. I have almost endless experience of all sorts of medical professionals from psychiatrists to nurses and everything in between.

Obviously as a UK resident my first port of call when it comes to health (both physical and mental) is my GP. GPs often feel like the gatekeepers to other services and organisations and i have always felt that it is vital to have a good working relationship with them.

However when it comes to mental health nothing is ever so simple. I would like to say that i have had predominantly good experiences but this is not the case.

I think the problem comes, to some extent from a combination of two factors: the fact that this is mental health and that i am a young person. Apparently these two things mean it is often harder for me not only to access the treatment i need but also to have problems recognised at all.

I wish i could say that i was alone in this experience but unfortunately that is far from the truth. I have spoken to countless other service users young and old about their experiences of GPs and they very much mirror my own. I wish i could tell you that young people weren’t told that their conditions were “a phase”/hormones/attention seeking/manipulative. Eating disorders are seen as a fad or a diet gone to far, depression dismissed. And if you were told this after opening up about something deeply personal that you may have not ever shared before, do you think you would go back or try and get a second opinion? I know i would think twice. I know it is a hard fact to stomach that some children and young people suffer from severe mental health problems but we can’t ignore or it deny these people help because it makes us uncomfortable.

All the evidence shows that a huge proportion of adults that have a mental health condition report symptoms starting in adolescence and the power of early intervention, as shown especially in EIiP (Early Intervention in Psychosis) services, cannot be denied.

And yet we still struggle to get our voices heard and to be taken seriously.

GPs need training not only in how to spot the warning signs of mental distress in children and young people but also need to be educated on atypical presentations (we don’t all neatly fit into diagnostic boxes) and a more holistic and open approach to young people.

Luckily today was a positive experience. In spite of all my anxiety in the run up to the appointment i was seen by a doctor that listened to me, took my opinions and preferences into account and made me feel relaxed.
It is just unfortunate that i can’t say that more often.